Visiting Artist Sheila Pepe Creates Social Sculpture in Eli Marsh Gallery

 

February 17, 2015
By Rachel Rogol

Sheila Pepe installationSheila Pepe: From Space to Place, Eli Marsh Gallery, 2015.

“Please don't touch the artwork” is not something you’ll hear when visiting the newest installation in Amherst’s Eli Marsh Gallery.

World-renowned contemporary artist Sheila Pepe—best known for her large-scale and site-specific works of knitting and crocheting—has created a remarkable installation that combines her hand-crocheted materials with artworks by Amherst faculty. The result is an intimate setting that welcomes visitors inside… to sit, to contemplate and, most interestingly, to participate.

March 30 — SOUNDFEST

They say that March is "in like a lion, out like a lamb". This year's Copeland Colloquium will bid farewell to this month of transition with a program of indoor and outdoor sound installation and performance, as lively and fierce and dynamic as a lion's roar (while we hope for lamb-like weather). We will feature work by Tim Eriksen, Wendy Woodson, Jake Meginsky, Eric Leonardson, Steph Robinson & Mark Santolucito. The event is free and open to the public.

Wendy Woodson Creates Video Installation for Australia’s Immigration Museum

Submitted on Friday, 1/6/2012, at 2:43 PM

Wendy Woodson, the Roger C. Holden 1919 Professor of Theater and Dance—in collaboration with designer Kathy Couch ’95 and sound designer Myles Mumford—has created a video installation titled Belonging: Reflections on Place, which will run in the Immigration Museum in Melbourne, Australia, until Jan. 22, 2012. The installation incorporates ambient music and street sounds, projected footage of movement and travel, and video interviews in which dozens of people from around the world reflect on their experiences as immigrants and refugees to Australia.

No Shower in This Tower

Winner of Mead Art Museum Contest Installs Artwork in Stearns Steeple

Jutting up into the sky in front of the Mead Art Museum, Stearns Steeple has long been one of the most impressive and distinctive features of the Amherst campus. We’ve all seen its stone exterior and heard its bells, but would you care to guess what else is now inside of it?