Stephen Park Swope

A memorial service to celebrate the life of Stephen Swope, 68, was held January 8, 2005, at the Yacht  Club in Riverside, Conn., where Stephen and his wife, Susan, lived on and off since 1965. He died December 8, 2004, of acute myelogenous leukemia in Seattle. He had battled the disease for over a year, ending up with what appeared to be a successful stem cell transplant, only to have the cancer suddenly roar back and take his life.

James Atwood, 10/20/1998

James Foster Atwood ’58

Jim Atwood died peacefully on October 20, 1998 at
Wilder Residence East in St. Paul, MN, after a long
period of ill health.
Jim was born July 4, 1938 in Minneapolis to
George Winthrop Atwood and Katherine May Atwood
(Clark). He received his secondary education at the
Blake School in Minneapolis, from which he graduated
with distinction. Jim went on to Amherst along with
two other Blake School students, Lynn Truesdell and
Peter Van Dusen.
At Amherst, Jim majored in history and was active

Joseph Harold Bennett ’58

After battling the debilitating effects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, for over a year, Hal Bennett died at his home in Short Hills, NJ on June 21, 1998 at the age of sixty-one.

Ed Greaves succumbed to cancer on July 14, 2001. Ed lived a uniquely productive and purposeful life. A life  of dedication to his loved ones and chosen involvements, love for his fellow man and, perhaps most important, an underlying sense of perspective and humor, made everyone who knew him very proud of that friendship.

We lost Dwight Cowan to bladder cancer on December
8, 2003. He will be sorely missed by everyone who
knew him.

Derek Graham Hepworth '58

The organist played Finlandia as Derek’s wife, Elaine, their five children (David ’80, Dennis, Derek ’85, Douglas and Suzanne Panico), most or all of his twelve grandchildren, many other family members and friends, Tom Gorman, Ginger and I left the May 13 Memorial Service at St. John the Evangelist Church, Swampscott, MA. I thought to myself “perfect, Derek must have been part Scandinavian.” “Not a drop”, I later was told by a family member. Still, the triumphant melody was an excellent tribute to Derek.

Alan Daus, 8/23/2000

Alan R. Daus '58


Alan R. Daus lost his life in the crash of a small plane
on August 23, 2000. The Cessna 180 with four people
aboard crashed in a remote area of the Alaska
Peninsula. Alan's wife, Ellen Feldman Daus, died the
next day before the rescue party could reach the
nearest hospital, from injuries sustained during the
crash. The pilot was also killed. The Dauses were on a
fishing expedition and were returning to the lodge at
which they had been staying, after a day of fishing at

Abbot Stott Gaunt '58

Toby Gaunt was born with a bad heart, and it troubled and threatened him in one way or another all his life. He had his third major cardiac surgery this past January; that was successful in itself, but complications from the hospital stay hit him hard. He suffered a massive staphylococcus infection, which his diabetes masked until it was too late to defeat it, and he died on March 30, 2006.

William Reopell, 8/10/2003


“Do you really believe that?? Come on now!!”

Thus would Bill Reopell begin another bull session,
Stearns 4, freshman year. His inflection and tone
denoted a clear degree of skepticism, no matter the
subject. But, always a participant, always questioning,
always philosophical, cheerful, and full of enthusiasm,
punctuated with a self-satisfying laugh.

Bill, who had been suffering from heart disease for
several years, died suddenly on August 10, 2003, of an
apparent heart attack while at a restaurant in
Swanzey, NH.

Stephen Park Swope

A memorial service to celebrate the life of Stephen Swope, 68, was held January 8, 2005, at the Yacht  Club in Riverside, Conn., where Stephen and his wife, Susan, lived on and off since 1965. He died December 8, 2004, of acute myelogenous leukemia in Seattle. He had battled the disease for over a year, ending up with what appeared to be a successful stem cell transplant, only to have the cancer suddenly roar back and take his life.

Pages