Final Assignment

Submitted by Karen J. Sanchez-Eppler on Tuesday, 4/24/2012, at 9:48 AM

Pick a specific passage or scene from either Chango’s Fire or Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close that helps you to reflect on the work we have done this semester.  Copy this passage or scene, identify its page number, and include it with your paper. Use your close observation skills to really analyze this passage, scene, or situation, paying attention to formal features as well as to content.  Connect the insights you pull from this analysis to two topics/sources we have studied this semester. At least one of these needs to be of something that happened or was produced before 1900. You should meditate on the changes and continuities of the city and on the ways that different kinds of materials provide different kinds of knowledge and on how combining them encourages richer insight. Pick something that matters to you.

 

5 pages, double spaced; plus a copy of your passage.

 

Due May 9th at 5 pm through Dropbox on the course webpage

 

Pages missing from 4/12/12 reading assignment on Robert Moses

Submitted by Carol C. Clark on Tuesday, 4/10/2012, at 1:02 PM

NYC Fieldtrip March 31

Submitted by Karen J. Sanchez-Eppler on Thursday, 3/29/2012, at 1:33 PM

We will leave from in front of Converse Hall at 7am on Saturday, March 31.

 There will be coffee, tea, and some breakfast food on the bus, as well as the many sandwiches we ordered that you can eat in the city or on the bus coming back to Amherst.

We advise you each to carry at least $20, although all you will need to purchase is around $5 of public transport, though you obviously may well want to buy more interesting things to eat than Valentine lunches.

 Wear layers and comfortable shoes for walking, and bring a rain jacket or umbrella (it is spring). Bring a bag or backpack for carrying Amherst food and it would be good to have an ATM card or extra cash for emergencies (like missing the bus back to Amherst). Bring your group’s map of the city and at least one camera for each group. Do exchange cell phone numbers with members of your group.

 We will reconvene BY 5pm at the same place in the city where you are dropped off.  Our cell phone numbers are Karen Sanchez-Eppler 413 687 4389, Carol Clark 413 374 1203.

 Use this trip to explore and photograph your neighborhood. Things to think about as you document your neighborhood include: life on the street, transportation into and around this neighborhood, the kind of work available in this neighborhood, the varieties of and relations between domestic, commercial, and communal space in this neighborhood, its landscaping and architecture, its public institutions and public art, its commemorative sites, the relationship between the old and the new. Ask yourself who lives and who works here and look for signs of resident and workforce age, religion, ethnicity, race, class. Because your presentation must have an argument, you need to think as a group about the particular things you want to say about this bit of the city and what images will help you to say it.

 Section 1 Groups are:


Lincoln Center [Leslie], Eunice, Anne, Samantha, Kearney;
Chelsea [Samson] [Justin],Shazi, Dustin, Mikey;
Greenwich Village [Dora], [Connor], Francheska, Katherine, Nazir, Geoffrey;
Times Square: [Matt], [Sarah], David, Haley, Jack;

Section 2 Groups are:

 Financial District Katie, Katie, Griff, Emmett, Will,

Lower East Side Leilani, Rebecca, Laurence, Alexus, Amelia

Soho Amina, Nicholas, Spencer, Ashleigh, Adam

China Town Porsche, Najela, Luis, Luca, Mike, Diana

 

Assignment 5

Submitted by Karen J. Sanchez-Eppler on Wednesday, 3/28/2012, at 4:34 PM

 

We have posted here a power point with all of the 60 paintings that constitute Jacob Lawrence’s “Migration of the Negro” series.  Choose one image. Make a list of all the details of content and form that you observe in this painting and its accompanying caption.  Write a two-page interpretation of this picture based on the details you observed and how you understand them to convey meaning. Conclude by thinking about how your picture functions as part of this numbered series of paintings.

 

2 pages, double spaced. Please turn in your 1 page list with your short essay.

 

Bring all this work to class on Thursday, March 29th for our discussion.  

 

Jacob Lawrence Assignment for Thurs March 29

Submitted by Carol C. Clark on Wednesday, 3/14/2012, at 5:42 PM

Assignment 4

Submitted by Karen J. Sanchez-Eppler on Wednesday, 3/14/2012, at 10:15 AM

On Thursday we will look at a website that provides an account of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire  www.ilr.cornell.edu/trianglefire  through a wide array of materials and kinds of evidence.  This site is engaged in an American Studies-style undertaking of looking at a single event through a variety of  sources.  Write a short essay that identifies the kinds of materials that are there, and think about how this website frames the event. What do you see, and how does this website guide your thinking? Does it have an agenda or an argument? How do Todd and Greenwald help you to interpret this site?

 

Your analysis will be the basis for our class discussion on Thursday, March 15.

 

2 pages, double spaced.

for Class Thurs March 8 Jacob Riis PowerPoint

Submitted by Carol C. Clark on Monday, 3/5/2012, at 3:56 PM
AttachmentSize
Jacob_Riis.pptx2.72 MB

Resources for Manhattan Neighborhood Projects

Submitted by Carol C. Clark on Tuesday, 3/13/2012, at 2:21 PM

Assignment 3 (Manhattan Neighborhoods)

Submitted by Karen J. Sanchez-Eppler on Thursday, 3/1/2012, at 10:44 PM

The City: New York                                                                             Spring 2012

AMST 112

Assignment 3

 

Each group will do historic research on a particular neighborhood before our trip to NYC on March 31st. This way you will have a sense of that neighborhood before you explore it on the ground.

 

First Step (for March 8th)

With what you have learned about working with census data during our March 1st workshop, use the census pages you have identified as a basis for analyzing who lived in your neighborhood, and how that neighborhood changed over time. Each of you will look  at such factors as race, age, household size and make up, employment, place of birth, literacy, etc. for the households enumerated on the same street in one census decade between 1850 and 1930, so your group as a whole will have information on that entire period.  Write a one page analysis of your street in your census and bring it to class on March 8th, where you will be able to compare these accounts with each other and think together about continuities and change in this bit of your neighborhood.

 

Second Step (between March 9th and March 30th

In preparation for our trip, research the basic history of your neighborhood, you don’t need an enormous amount of detail, but you do need a basic outline of the ways this place has changed over time.  You also need to think some as a group about how you want to use your time in the city.

 

Third Step (March 31st FIELDTRIP)

Use this trip to explore and photograph your neighborhood. Things to think about as you document your neighborhood include: life on the street, transportation into and around this neighborhood, the kind of work available in this neighborhood, the varieties of and relations between domestic, commercial, and communal space in this neighborhood, its landscaping and architecture, its public institutions and public art, its commemorative sites,  the relationship between the old and the new. Ask yourself who lives and who works here and look for signs of resident and workforce age, religion, ethnicity, race, class. Because your presentation must have an argument, you need to think as a group about the particular things you want to say about this bit of the city and what images will help you to say it.

 

Fourth Step (April 24th—evening)

Prepare a 10 minute power point presentation to share you findings with the rest of our two classes. Your presentation should include the fruits of your historical research and photographs you took during our field-trip as well as other sorts of visual and textual information. This presentation should make an argument about your neighborhood.

 

 Neighborhood project groups

Section 1 Groups are:


Lincoln Center [Leslie], Eunice, Anne, Samantha, Kearney;


Chelsea [Samson], [Justin],Shazi, Dustin, Mikey;


Greenwich Village [Dora], [Connor], Francheska, Katherine, Nazir, Geoffrey;


Times Square: [Matt], [Sarah], David, Haley, Jack;

Section 2 Groups are:

 

Financial District: Katie, Katie, Griff, Emmett, Will,

 

Lower East Side Leilani, Rebecca, Laurence, Alexus, [Amelia]

 

Soho Amina, Nicholas, Spencer, Ashleigh, Adam

 

China Town Porsche, Najela, Luis, Luca, Mike, Diana

 

Names in brackets will not be traveling to NYC on March 31st.

Assignment 2

Submitted by Karen J. Sanchez-Eppler on Thursday, 2/9/2012, at 9:25 AM

 

This is a small assignment that asks you to “dive into the dark holes and alleys” as Ned Buntline would put it, of Herman Melville’s writing. Pick a passage from Bartleby, no longer than four sentences, that depicts something about the space of the city or what it means to live in it. Copy your passage at the top of the page. Below it make a list of observations of everything you notice about this piece of writing. Think about imagery, word choice, syntax, punctuation, rhythm, tone, narration, and perspective. Each observation should be a full sentence or two; don’t just make a list of words or phrases.

 

Then on a separate piece of paper write a short essay that interprets what you have seen—that is, pull a relevant cluster of your observations together into a reading of this passage. End with a short paragraph that speculates on what a different sort of disciplinary knowledge or different kinds of evidence could bring to your interpretation of this passage. What might your reading gain through a more interdisciplinary approach?

 

Due in class on February 14th. Bring two copies to class with you for discussion. After class revise your paper and email a revised copy to your assignment to your professor by 5pm on Thursday February 16th.

 

1 page of your passage and a list of observations

1-2 page paper double spaced, 12 point font (at least 250 words; no more than 500 words)

Pages

 

Taking Notes