Spring 2013

Wine, History and the Environment

Listed in: Environmental Studies, as ENST-401  |  History, as HIST-402

Moodle site: Course (Guest Accessible)

Faculty

Rick A. Lopez (Section 01)
Anna M. Martini (Section 01)

Description

(Offered as HIST 402 [c] and ENST 401.) Wine is as old as Western civilization. Its consumption is deeply wedded to leading religious and secular traditions around the world. Its production has transformed landscapes, ecosystems, and economies. In this course we examine how wine has shaped the history of Europe, North Africa, and the Americas. Through readings, scientific study, historical research, and class discussion, students will learn about such issues as: the environmental impact of wine; the politics of taste and class; the organization of labor; the impact of imperialism and global trade; the late nineteenth-century phylloxera outbreak that almost destroyed the European wine industry; and the emergence of claims about terroir (the notion that each wine, like each culture, is uniquely tied to a place) and how such claims are tied to regional and national identity. Through class discussion, focused research and writing workshops, and close mentoring, each student will learn about wine while designing and executing an independent research project. We will also get our hands dirty with soil sampling, learn the basics of sediment analysis in the laboratory, and have a go at fermentation. Two meetings per week.

This is a research seminar open to juniors and seniors. Priority given to history and environmental studies majors. History majors may take this course either as a research seminar or in place of HIST 301 “Writing the Past.”

Fall semester.  Limited to 15 students.  Professor Hunt.  Spring semester.  Limited to 20 students. Professors López and Martini.

Keywords

Writing attentive, Speaking attentive

Offerings

2015-16: Offered in Spring 2016
Other years: Offered in Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014