2022 Reunion Schedule

Programs will be posted and updated as they are confirmed. Note that private class programs, including class dinners, do not appear on the public schedule; they will be included in the schedule attendees will receive upon check-in. Please check back frequently to see what's new!

All programs are 60 minutes unless otherwise noted. Find locations on our Campus Map.
Use the fields below to search the Reunion Schedule.

Wednesday, June 1, 2022
2:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Smith House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Reception Center will close at 9 p.m.
Smith House, 22 Hitchcock Road (across from Orr Rink)
7:00 PM to 8:00 PM
The Eight Layers of Vladimir Putin
In this lecture, William Taubman, the Bertrand Snell Professor of Political Science, Emeritus, will identify eight periods of Putin’s life which were more than simply passages he lived through. Rather, they were periods which built on each other to create the man who has been brutalizing Ukraine. Along the way, Professor Taubman will talk about Russian domestic events which shaped Putin and which he has shaped and about international developments, such as NATO expansion, to which he has reacted so negatively but which he is now unintentionally encouraging.
Johnson Chapel
Thursday, June 2, 2022
8:00 AM to 10:00 PM
Smith House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Reception Center will close at 10 p.m.
Smith House, 22 Hitchcock Road (across from Orr Rink)
10:30 AM to 11:30 AM
Tour of the Amherst Bunker, Holyoke Range
Tour the former U.S. Strategic Air Command (Northeast Command) nuclear communications bunker and learn of its history, led by Aaron Hayden, the College’s Capital Projects Manager and the unofficial authority on the history of the Bunker. The Bunker has served as the Amherst College Book Depository since its purchase by the College in 1992. Each tour is limited to 30 people. Please sign up in advance. If space is available, you may sign up on-site at the Smith House Reception Center (22 Hitchcock Road). Please note: You will need to provide your own transportation to and from the Bunker.
Amherst Bunker, 100 Military Drive, off Route 116 in the Holyoke Range
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
“That extraordinary man”: A Spaniard’s Tale of Survival in a Nazi Camp
One of the earliest first-person testimonial accounts of World War II and the Holocaust was published in Spain in 1946. Buried in the stacks of Madrid’s National Library, this memoir of a Spanish concentration camp survivor had been all but forgotten. With the help of a team of Amherst College student researchers, Professor of Spanish Sara J. Brenneis has been piecing together how a Spanish soldier who fought against Franco and Hitler came to publish his account in a fascist newspaper soon after his liberation. His life story upends the typical trajectory of the thousands of non-Jewish Spanish political prisoners deported to and killed in Nazi camps. From French refugee encampments, to the Austrian Nazi fortress of Mauthausen, to the Franco regime’s little-known Department of Judaism, this presentation will unravel one of the most intriguing mysteries to emerge from a supposedly neutral Spain during World War II.
Stirn Auditorium
1:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Navigating the Paradox of Iron: Lessons from Plants
Professor Jeeyon Jeong’s research focuses on investigating the molecular mechanisms of iron regulation in plants. Iron is an essential micronutrient in virtually all organisms, but it is also potentially toxic. Therefore, iron must be tightly controlled at the molecular, cellular and physiological levels. By studying iron homeostasis in plants, the Jeong Lab, which is led by Professor Jeong and consists of Amherst students, aims to contribute critical knowledge that will advance biology and provide insights to improve plant and human nutrition. As a scientist and an educator at a liberal arts college, Professor Jeong has also been working toward effectively integrating research and education, and is committed to building an inclusive and collaborative research community. The Jeong Lab will continue to serve as a classroom in action where students actively engage in science research and grow as scientists and leaders who can advocate for science. Presented by Jeeyon Jeong, Assistant Professor of Biology.
Stirn Auditorium
1:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Dinosaur Tracks and More: Ichnology Tour
For over 170 years, a “Cabinet of Curiosities” has existed on the campus of Amherst College. One of the most significant curiosities is our world-famous dinosaur track collection. Join our museum staff to learn a bit about the collection’s history and the scientific importance of the collection today. We look forward to exploring Amherst before it was Amherst. Bring your cameras!
Beneski Museum of Natural History
2:30 PM to 3:30 PM
Antarctica and Global Climate: Insights from the Bottom of the Planet
Often the subject of nature documentaries and explorer biographies, Antarctica feels far removed from our daily lives. But its remoteness belies its importance to the Earth system. The Antarctic ice sheet is a dynamic component of the climate, and its behavior over the last several million years has led to dramatic swings in temperature at the global scale. Assistant Professor of Geology Nick Holschuh’s research is focused on understanding the past and present of the Antarctic ice sheet, as the ice sheet itself is both an incredible source of information about Earth’s history and a major source of risk for coastlines on a warming planet. Professor Holschuh will provide a brief overview of the tools we use to study the Antarctic ice sheet, the ongoing changes we observe there and the active Antarctic research at Amherst College that is helping to bring the system into focus.
Stirn Auditorium
2:30 PM to 3:30 PM
The Amherst Origins of Ranked Choice Voting
Amherst College’s alumni and faculty have a long history of involvement with politics. But a fascinating thread involves the electoral reform called ranked choice voting, which helps ensure majority rule and better representation. Also known as instant runoff voting for single-seat offices, and as single transferable vote or proportional representation for legislative bodies, it was introduced in the 19th century and slowly gained interest around the world. Amherst's engagement with the reform began almost 130 years ago, at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, and winds its way through Rhode Island, New York City, Cambridge, Worcester, Santa Fe, and, of course, Amherst. The protagonists include Republicans, Democrats, Progressives and Communists; a governor, a mayor, a city councilor and a school committeewoman; and many reform-minded citizens. Over the decades they helped topple political machines and elevate baseball stars. The tale is mammoth! Presented by Andy Anderson, Senior Academic Technology Specialist for Data Science and Spatial Analysis.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Agitation Yields Access: Activism and the Formation of Higher Education, 1962–Present
This session will explore the confrontation of universities and colleges with the tumultuous social movements of the past and present. Whether it was connections to the Cold War, the civil rights movement or curricular changes, students were in the vanguard of the campaigns to restructure higher education. This interactive session will center the efforts of Black students and their progressive allies to check what they viewed as racism and imperialism. Presented by Stefan Bradley, Professor of Black Studies and History.
Stirn Auditorium
8:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Emily and Sue

Emily and Sue is a new a cappella pop opera about the romantic relationship between the poet Emily Dickinson and her sister-in-law-to-be, Susan Gilbert. On the night before Susan is to wed Emily’s brother, Emily wrestles with her love for Sue, her poetic voices and the impending dawn. The world-premiere production stars Metropolitan Opera vocalist Jasmine Muhammad, with a cappella music by the nationally acclaimed Iris Vocal Trio. The 40-minute work was commissioned by Amherst College as part of its Bicentennial celebration. Music by Dana Kaufman ’12, libretto by Aiden K. Feltkamp with text by Emily Dickinson and Susan Huntington Gilbert Dickinson, and direction by Ron Bashford ’88. Lighting and scenic design by Kathy Couch ’95, with costuming by Lorelei Dietz ’20. Made possible by the Amherst Arts Series Fund and the Department of Theater and Dance.

Please sign up in advance. If space is available, you may sign up on-site at the Smith House Reception Center (22 Hitchcock Road). 

Holden Experimental Theater
Friday, June 3, 2022
8:00 AM to 11:59 PM
Smith House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Reception Center will close at midnight.
Smith House, 22 Hitchcock Road (across from Orr Rink)
9:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Tour and Planting Seeds at Book & Plow Farm
Amherst owns and runs a working farm, Book & Plow Farm. It grows all manner of produce and supplies Valentine Dining Hall. And the produce is so local that the farm is just a 15-minute walk from campus. There, we’ll meet Farm Managers Maida Ives and Kaylee Brow for a tour of the Core Site and a (kid-friendly) farm activity, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. We’ll go rain or shine, as we’ll be meeting at the greenhouse. Maps to the farm will be available at the Converse Hall Reception Center, and parking is available for people who prefer to drive. You are also welcome to visit the farm at any point during the weekend to enjoy the view!
Book & Plow Farm Greenhouse on Tuttle Hill, 425 South East Street, Amherst
9:00 AM to 10:00 AM
Those Who Teach and Those Who Learn: A Conversation with the Provost and Dean of the Faculty
Join Catherine Epstein, Provost and Dean of the Faculty and Winkley Professor of History, for a wide-ranging conversation about Amherst’s academic landscape. Among other topics, Dean Epstein will discuss academic initiatives, pedagogical innovation and the changing faculty at the College.
Lipton Lecture Hall (E110), Science Center
10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Explore the New Science Center
Take a self-guided tour of Amherst’s newest building and learn more about the College’s Office of Sustainability. Wes Dripps ’92, Director of Sustainability, and Margot Lurie ’21, Green Dean in the Office of Sustainability, will be available to answer questions about the building and sustainability efforts on campus from 10 a.m. to noon.
Living Room (Main Lobby), Science Center
10:30 AM to 12:00 PM
Screening of Raise Hell: The Life & Times of Molly Ivins

Join award-winning producer James (Mike) Egan ’72 for a screening of his documentary film. Molly was a 6-foot-tall firebrand journalist and Smithie who shattered the glass ceiling in journalism and risked her life to speak truth to power. Her razor-sharp wit left both sides of the aisle laughing and craving ink in her columns. She knew the Bill of Rights was in peril and said, “Polarizing people is a good way to win an election, and also a good way to wreck a country.” Molly’s words have proved prescient. The New York Times described Raise Hell as “stellar documentary filmmaking.” Rotten Tomatoes reviewed it as one of the “Best Films of the 21st Century.” Runtime: 83 minutes. Presented by the Class of 1972.

Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
10:30 AM to 11:30 AM
What is the Status of Native Americans in the 21st Century?
Lisa Brooks, Ph.D., the Henry S. Poler ’59 Presidential Teaching Professor of English and American Studies, will show how Indigenous writing has been a tool for self-determination and sovereignty in spite of oppressive U.S. policy, highlighting Native authors from the 19th through 21st centuries in the Kim-Wait/Eisenberg Native American Literature Collection, Frost Library Archives. Reid Chambers ’62, J.D., former Associate Solicitor for Indian Affairs, U.S. Department of the Interior, will discuss how federal policies regarding Native peoples evolved, beginning in the 1970s, from tight federal control over reservations to tribal self-governance of reservations and most federal programs serving them. William Freeman ’62, M.D., M.P.H., M.J.I.L., former Chair of the Indian Health Service’s Institutional Review Board, will discuss Native advocacy that is upending established but outdated federal regulatory standards and professional procedures in health, genetics and behavioral research.
Stirn Auditorium
10:30 AM to 11:30 AM
Inside the Partnership between the Mead Art Museum and Athletics
Join Miloslava Hruba, Mead Study Room Manager and European Print Specialist, and Billy McBride, Associate Athletic Director for Diversity and Inclusion, Director of Club Sports and Senior Coach, to learn more about the partnership between the Mead Art Museum and the Department of Athletics to help acquire contemporary art for the museum. Our collaborations center art appreciation, creativity and community building, and so will this morning’s program.
Friedmann Room, Keefe Campus Center
1:00 PM to 2:00 PM
The Supreme Court, Late and Soon
As the Supreme Court winds down a consequential and controversial term, join a conversation with Jack MacKenzie ’52; George Freeman ’71, P’09,’15; Austin Sarat; and the audience about the controversial cases it is deciding, its ideological bent and the perception that it is being politicized. MacKenzie covered the Supreme Court for The Washington Post (1965–77) and wrote editorials about it for The New York Times (1977–97). Freeman is the Executive Director of the Media Law Resource Center and, for over 30 years, was the in-house First Amendment and newsroom attorney for The New York Times. Sarat is the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science and Chair of Political Science. Presented by the Classes of 1952 and 1971.
Johnson Chapel
1:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Exploring the Kim-Wait/Eisenberg Native American Literature Collection
An informally guided tour, led by Lisa Brooks, the Henry S. Poler ’59 Presidential Teaching Professor of English and American Studies, and Mike Kelly, Head of Archives and Special Collections, of Native American writings from the 18th through 21st centuries that helped advance Native American self-determination and sovereignty and are now included in the Younghee Kim-Wait (AC ’82) / Pablo Eisenberg Native American Literature Collection. A student-curated exhibition of books from the collection will be on view on the A-Level of Frost throughout Reunion, viewable anytime Frost Library is open. Presented by the Class of 1962.
Archives and Special Collections, Frost Library
1:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Our Experiences in Vietnam and the Value of Looking Back
Michael Kramer ’67 will moderate a panel discussion among classmates who were in Vietnam during the war, focusing on memories of their experiences, how their time there has impacted their lives since and what lessons can be learned for the U.S. and the world. Panelists include Ed Allen ’67, Bill Clamurro ’67, Beaman Cummings ’67 and Kim McMullin ’67, P’00,’01,’06,’08. Presented by the Class of 1967.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
1:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Beneski Museum “Dinosaur Tracks and More - Ichnology” Tour
For over 170 years, a “Cabinet of Curiosities” has existed on the campus of Amherst College. One of the most significant curiosities is our world-famous dinosaur track collection. Join our museum staff to learn a bit about the collection’s history and the scientific importance of the collection today. We look forward to exploring Amherst before it was Amherst. Bring your cameras!
Beneski Museum of Natural History
2:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Office of Identity and Cultural Resources Centers Open House
Drop in to the Multicultural Resource Center, Queer Resource Center, Women’s and Gender Center, Center for International Student Engagement and Class & Access Resource Center to revisit these spaces and reconnect with the center directors. Open House ends at 4 p.m.
Keefe Campus Center
2:30 PM to 3:30 PM
What Scientists Have Learned from the COVID-19 Crisis
Paul Bunn ’67, M.D., describes what we have learned about COVID-19 and why this particular virus has had such a huge global impact. He will also explain how the development of the mRNA delivery mechanism has changed the science and practice of medicine with respect to vaccines and other antiviral therapies. Presented by the Class of 1967.
Friedmann Room, Keefe Campus Center
2:30 PM to 3:30 PM
Emily Dickinson: Her Verse and Her Universe
There will be a presentation about Emily Dickinson’s poetry by Karen Sánchez-Eppler, the L. Stanton Williams 1941 Professor of American Studies and English, and another about her life in Amherst by Anna Plummer ’20, a scholar who specializes in the Dickinson family. The presentations will be followed by discussion and Q&A. Presented by the Class of 1962.
Lipton Lecture Hall (E110), Science Center
2:30 PM to 3:30 PM
A Discussion on the Evolution of American Studies—1973–2022: “We the People” or “Me the People”?
Join in a panel discussion examining changes in the field of American studies over the past 45 years. Panelists will explore developments in society and higher education that have driven these changes. We will ask questions about the focus of courses, including balancing the study of “the collective experience” of what it means to be American and exploring differences in the experiences of groups of Americans over time. Panelists include Debby Applegate ’89, who received her Ph.D. from Yale in American studies and has taught at Yale University, Wesleyan University and Marymount College; and David Gellman ’88, an Early American historian and professor of history at DePauw University. The panel will be moderated by Rick Pfeiffer ’77. Presented by the Class of 1977.
Stirn Auditorium
2:30 PM to 3:30 PM
Tour of the Amherst Bunker, Holyoke Range
Tour the former U.S. Strategic Air Command (Northeast Command) nuclear communications bunker and learn of its history, led by Aaron Hayden, the College’s Capital Projects Manager and the unofficial authority on the history of the Bunker. The Bunker has served as the Amherst College Book Depository since its purchase by the College in 1992. Each tour is limited to 30 people. Please sign up in advance. If space is available, you may sign up on-site at the Smith House Reception Center (22 Hitchcock Road). Please note: You will need to provide your own transportation to and from the Bunker.
Amherst Bunker, 100 Military Drive, off Route 116 in the Holyoke Range
2:30 PM to 3:30 PM
Then and Now: The World in 1968 and 2022
Join us for lightning TED-style 8-minute talks highlighting the transformation of science and technology between our first day at Amherst and today. Topics will include our understanding of the universe, Earth, our energy systems, computing and biomedical sciences. A moderator will spend the last 20-30 minutes taking questions/comments from the audience and facilitating discussion among the panelists. Presenters include David J. Helfand ’72, David Levenson ’72, P’07, and Phil Shapiro ’72. Presented by the Class of 1972.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Revisiting the Rock Revolution
A trip back to the music of our Amherst years, led by music historian (and performer) Mike Campbell ’67. Mike’s presentation will place “our” music in a broader historical context to demonstrate more emphatically why the 1960s were such a special time in music history. Presented by the Class of 1967.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Beyond the Empty Nest
As we enter our final decades, we need to give thought to how we will live out a time when, inevitably, our health and vigor decline. Our immediate families may not live nearby, but even if they did, there are many circumstances where they would not be able to meet our needs on their own. This session will focus on an increasingly popular way of addressing these issues: the retirement community. The panel will attempt to review some of the ways these communities have evolved. Issues we will address include age-in-place versus moving to a retirement community, nonprofit versus for-profit communities, and apartment rental versus a condominium model. Financial considerations will also be looked at in detail, as well as the option (if all else fails) of starting your own community. Panelists include Dan Leonard ’57 and Kim Temple ’57, with Jim Mollenauer ’57, P’88,’92, serving as a panelist and moderator. Presented by the Class of 1957.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Sustainability at Amherst: The Path Forward
Higher education institutions play a key role in educating for sustainability; charting sustainable paths and solutions; and developing sustainable communities that are socially just and equitable, environmentally sound and resilient, and economically viable and inclusive. Amherst recently created an Office of Environmental Sustainability under academic affairs, with the desire to integrate sustainability across the curriculum, co-curriculum and operations of the College. Join Wes Dripps ’92, the new Director of Sustainability, for a look at Amherst’s sustainability efforts and path forward. Presented by the Class of 1992.
Lipton Lecture Hall (E110), Science Center
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Navigating the Future of Work: Contemplating In-Person, Hybrid and Remote Work
Join HR leaders to develop an understanding of the trade-offs in defining your location strategy, and learn what questions to ask to determine the optimal approach or strategy for your business or team. Discuss the impact of hybrid and remote work on talent acquisition; diversity, equity and inclusion; attrition; and professional development. Panelists include Lisa Friscia ’02, Founder and CEO, Franca Consulting, Former Chief People Officer; Pamela Golden ’97, VP, People, Panther Labs; Dan Mardeusz ’82, P’16, Senior Manager, HR (retired); and Carla Schneider Muskat ’82, P’12,’18, Global HR Director, Pathfinder International (retired). Moderated by Amherst College Trustee Rejji Hayes ’97, EVP and CFO, CMS Energy Corporation. Presented by the Classes of 1982, 1997 and 2002.
Johnson Chapel
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
A Conversation with Barry O’Connell
Barry O’Connell, the James E. Ostendarp Professor of English, Emeritus, retired this January after 50 years at Amherst. Join Professor O'Connell in conversation and reflection with Rick Pfeiffer 77. Presented by the Class of 1977.
Stirn Auditorium
5:00 PM to 6:30 PM
Reception with President Biddy Martin
Join President Biddy Martin and others from the College for conversation and celebration. All are welcome. Reception ends at 6:30 p.m.
Valentine Quad
8:00 PM to 10:00 PM
Reset: The 22nd In-Person Apocalypse Party
Apocalypse is a party for people who don’t like parties, hosted by Planworld (planworld.amherst.edu). After two virtual years, we return with a new day, a new location and a new menu. The great conversations and organized chaos are still promised/threatened. If you have no idea what this is all about or if you are a wandering soul, please drop by.
Valentine Quad
8:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Emily and Sue

Emily and Sue is a new a cappella pop opera about the romantic relationship between the poet Emily Dickinson and her sister-in-law-to-be, Susan Gilbert. On the night before Susan is to wed Emily’s brother, Emily wrestles with her love for Sue, her poetic voices and the impending dawn. The world-premiere production stars Metropolitan Opera vocalist Jasmine Muhammad, with a cappella music by the nationally acclaimed Iris Vocal Trio. The 40-minute work was commissioned by Amherst College as part of its Bicentennial celebration. Music by Dana Kaufman ’12, libretto by Aiden K. Feltkamp with text by Emily Dickinson and Susan Huntington Gilbert Dickinson, and direction by Ron Bashford ’88. Lighting and scenic design by Kathy Couch ’95, with costuming by Lorelei Dietz ’20. Made possible by the Amherst Arts Series Fund and the Department of Theater and Dance.

Please sign up in advance. If space is available, you may sign up on-site at the Smith House Reception Center (22 Hitchcock Road). 

Holden Experimental Theater
Saturday, June 4, 2022
8:00 AM to 9:30 PM
Smith House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Reception Center will close at 9:30 p.m.
Smith House, 22 Hitchcock Road (across from Orr Rink)
9:00 AM to 10:00 AM
Learning to Live with Viruses: The Pandemic of Our Generation
Join experts from the Class of 1962 for a presentation on the COVID-19 pandemic. Ed Goetzl ’62, P’89,’92, M.D., will open with an overview of the pandemic. Gerry Fink ’62, H’82, P’84, Ph.D., will present on SARS-CoV-2, a formidable foe, and Steve Hauschka ’62, Ph.D., Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Washington, will report on COVID vaccine biochemistry and immunology. A general discussion and Q&A with additional panelists Larry Beck ’62, P’92,’07, M.D., and Irwin Buchwald ’62, M.D., will follow. Presented by the Class of 1962.
Lipton Lecture Hall (E110), Science Center
9:00 AM to 10:00 AM
Family Fun with the Eric Carle Museum
Come join the Eric Carle Museum for a fun, virtually facilitated event for children and parents, complete with an interactive project. This event is suitable for children ages 4 and up. All necessary materials will be provided. Presented by the Class of 2007.
Kirkpatrick Lecture Hall (A011), Science Center
9:00 AM to 10:00 AM
Morning Hikes
Join the Class of 2017 for a nostalgic adventure featuring the best views the College has to offer. Presented by the Class of 2017.
Meet outside the entrance to Wieland Hall
9:00 AM to 10:00 AM
Not Just Another Conversation About Race: Where Do We Go from Here?
This panel invites the audience to engage with open hearts and open minds. The conversation should start with an acknowledgment that each of us has a singular lived experience and, equally, each of us has unconscious biases. We will bring together alumni from diverse professions to begin designing a framework of common interests and collective tools so that each of us may advance positive change. Panelists include Lisa Chang ’82, P’13, J.D.; Amherst College Trustee Kimberlyn Leary ’82, Ph.D.; Lateef Mtima ’82, J.D.; and Paul Simmons ’82, M.D. The moderator for the panel is Karin Immergut ’82, U.S. District Court Judge. Presented by the Class of 1982.
Johnson Chapel
9:00 AM to 10:00 AM
Amherst in Transition (1968–1972)
During the summer of 1968, the incoming Class of 1972 was asked to read the autobiographies of Benjamin Franklin and Malcolm X. Kim Townsend G’11, Class of 1959 Professor of English, Emeritus, delivered a freshman orientation lecture on the books in Johnson Chapel. Horace Porter ’72, P’07, Professor of American Studies, Emeritus, at The University of Iowa, was one of the incoming African American students in the audience. Townsend and Porter will start with the orientation event and focus on Amherst College and related matters, including Vietnam, Black studies, Presidents Plimpton and Ward, the two moratoria and the protests at Westover Air Reserve Base. Presented by the Class of 1972.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
9:00 AM to 10:00 AM
The College Admissions Process in Today’s World
Join Alison (Ali) Segal ’97, former Admissions Officer, College Counselor and Director of College Access at Evanston Scholars, and current Therapist-in-Training at The Family Institute at Northwestern University, for a casual conversation to help parents prepare to navigate the college admissions process and understand how the landscape has changed over time. What is different now versus when we applied? What differentiates an applicant? How can parents minimize stress in the process for themselves and their children? What are the implications of colleges moving away from testing? Bring your questions! Presented by the Class of 1997.
Stirn Auditorium
9:00 AM to 10:00 AM
Daniel Webster and The Birth of American Nationalism: A conversation with Joel Richard Paul ’77 and Jan Saragoni ’77, P’03
Joel Richard Paul ’77, author of the forthcoming book, INDIVISIBLE: Daniel Webster and the Birth of American Nationalism, will discuss the competing ideas of what it meant to be an American in the Jacksonian era and how the populist-racist idea of American identity was ultimately displaced by the constitutional nationalism popularized by Massachusetts senator Daniel Webster. Paul argues that Webster’s ideas shaped Lincoln’s thinking and triumphed in the Civil War. Paul, a professor of constitutional law, is also the author of WITHOUT PRECEDENT: Chief Justice John Marshall and His Times and UNLIKELY ALLIES: How a Merchant, a Playwright, and a Spy Saved the American Revolution. Jan Saragoni ’77, P’03 is a Boston-based public relations and issues management consultant. Presented by the Class of 1977.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
10:15 AM to 11:15 AM
Ed Popielarczyk: Comedy and Magic
Join us for an entertaining and fun magic show with the amazing Ed Popielarczyk, a professional magician, balloon sculptor, flea circus ringmaster and storyteller. Ed will keep kids enthralled and adults smiling during this comedy magic show with lots of audience participation.
Main Quadrangle
10:15 AM to 11:15 AM
The Challenges of Aging: What Do Life Stories and Evidence Tell Us About Healthy, Meaningful Aging?
The program will be introduced by Catherine A. Sanderson, Ph.D., Poler Family Professor of Psychology, Chair of the Department of Psychology and author of The Positive Shift, a book about how mindset influences happiness, health and longevity. Life stories and commentary will be presented by David McK. Lawrence ’62, H’94, P’91,’01, M.D., M.P.H., former Dean of the School of Medicine at the Keck Graduate Institute and former CEO of Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals; William Leland ’62, M.Ed., former Associate Dean of Students, Stanford, and current Board Chair of Santa Cruz Community Health Centers; and Philip Lilienthal ’62, P’95, Founder of Global Camps Africa, Peace Corps volunteer and staff, private practice attorney and owner/director of a Maine summer camp. Presented by the Class of 1962.
Lipton Lecture Hall (E110), Science Center
10:15 AM to 11:15 AM
Parenting at Multiple Ages
Two Class of 1992 experts on parenting, education and child behavior discuss the challenges inherent in parenting children at different stages of their—and our—lives. Presented by Kate Dimond Fitzgerald ’92, M.D., Ruane Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Columbia University / New York State Psychiatric Institute, and Keith Millner ’92, Director of Children’s Learning Institute Programs and Founding Director of the CLI Solutions Group. Presented by the Class of 1992.
Kirby Memorial Theater
10:15 AM to 11:15 AM
A Long, Crazy Journey from Amherst to Happiness
Scott Hunter ’67 reflects on his journey to Southeast Asia as a conscientious objector during the Vietnam War, life beneath 16 hemlock poles surrounded by canvas in a conical shape with a fire pit in the center when he returned to the U.S., a drug addiction that led to homelessness, and then a very happy life in recovery as an ultrarunner, memoirist and landscaper. Presented by the Class of 1967.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
10:15 AM to 11:15 AM
5th Reunion Kickball Game
Come play one of the old playground favorites with the 5th Reunion classes. Presented by the Classes of 2015, 2016 and 2017.
Hitchcock Field
10:15 AM to 11:15 AM
Ending Homelessness in America: What’s It Going to Take?
Many Americans view homelessness as an intractable problem that only ever seems to get worse. Yet, 14 U.S. communities have now ended homelessness for target populations using a heavily data-driven, housing-focused methodology developed by the nonprofit Community Solutions. Join Jake Maguire ’07, Senior Advisor to Community Solutions President Rosanne Haggerty ’82, H’03, to discuss the organization’s Built for Zero approach, which recently won the MacArthur Foundation’s global competition for a single $100 million grant to scale its proven solution to ending homelessness. Presented by the Class of 2007.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
10:15 AM to 11:15 AM
Class of 1987 Lecture: How Psychedelics Are Rapidly Revolutionizing the Fields of Psychology and Mental Health
You dabbled at Amherst, your kids are micro-dosing, you’re tempted to invest—it’s high time to learn what’s really going on with psychedelics. Join two world-renowned and pioneering neuroscientists, Dr. Robin Carhart-Harris, head of psychedelic research at UCSF, and Dr. Jerrold Rosenbaum, head of Harvard’s newly minted Center for the Neuroscience of Psychedelics, as we explore groundbreaking developments in the use of psilocybin and other psychotropic agents in treating depression, PTSD, addiction and other mental health ailments, as well as facilitating personal growth and healthy relationships. Turn on, tune in and drop by! Presented by the Class of 1987.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
10:15 AM to 11:15 AM
Reunion Soccer Game
The Amherst men’s and women’s soccer teams will sponsor a game between odd- and even-class soccer alumni. Bring your soccer things (shirt, shorts, socks, cleats and shin guards), RSVP to Coach Alex Ortega (aortega@amherst.edu) so we have a headcount and spread the word to your classmates and teammates!
Gooding Turf Field
11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
A Conversation with #19 and #20 and the Annual Meeting of the Society of the Alumni and the Alumni Council
A conversation between Biddy Martin, the 19th president of Amherst College, and Michael A. Elliott '92, whose tenure as the 20th president of the College will commence on August 1. Additional seating and a livestream will be available in Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center.
Johnson Chapel
11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Balloon Sculpting with Ed Popielarczyk
Hats, animals, airplanes, cartoon characters, flowers, motorcycles—Ed can sculpt hundreds of things with balloons! Stop by until 1:30 p.m. and make a request!
Main Quadrangle
12:00 PM to 1:30 PM
Annual Reunion Luncheon
Join us for a complimentary luncheon under the tent on the Valentine Quad. Look for your classmates under the decade signs!
Valentine Quad
1:45 PM to 2:45 PM
Education Today: Where Do We Go from Here?
Our education system faced serious challenges even before 2020, and COVID has forced us to rethink “the way things have been done” and truly grapple with the inequities in our education system—as well as explore opportunities. Come join a group of practitioners in a variety of contexts to discuss the current state of education and where we go from here. Panelists include Rebecca Binder ’02, Lisa Friscia ’02, Nicole Lopez ’02, Annie Reinish ’02 and Jess Wall ’12. Presented by the Classes of 2002 and 2012.
Lipton Lecture Hall (E110), Science Center
1:45 PM to 2:45 PM
Amherst Alumni Reflections: Everyone Loves Someone Who Had an Abortion
Popularized by Renee Bracey Sherman, the phrase “Everyone loves someone who had an abortion” centers love in the fight for bodily autonomy. For Nicole Bishop ’12, Anna Castro ’12 and Amanda Villarreal ’12, the fight for bodily autonomy has been driven by love of community, innovation and the future. The Class of 2012 invites you to join this conversation and share how the fight for bodily autonomy has impacted you. Above all, we ask you to remember that… everyone loves someone who had an abortion. Presented by the Class of 2012.
Kirby Memorial Theater
1:45 PM to 2:45 PM
Michael Wald’s Comedy Magic
Michael Wald is a showman of the first order. With a tip of the hat to vaudeville, slapstick and “one-liner” comedy, his magic is engaging and seeks out every opportunity for a joke or a quick improvisation with an audience member called up to assist. These assistants end up holding the trump cards and afford Michael the chance for more comedy as he celebrates the consequences of his own personal foibles.
Main Quadrangle
1:45 PM to 2:45 PM
Mobilizing Power for a More Perfect Union: Lessons of Amherst Activists Then and Now
The Class of 1972 lived four tumultuous years in American political history. The war and draft, racial reckonings, mass protests, political assassinations, seminal elections—each and all of us were marked uniquely and in life-changing ways. Speakers will discuss how their Amherst experiences informed their approaches to mobilizing and using power for political and social change—then and now. Panelists include Tom Davis ’71, H’09, seven-term former GOP member of Congress from Virginia (1995–2008), partner in the law firm Holland & Knight and past head of the Board of Visitors of George Mason University; Jean Fugett ’72, P’11, Super Bowl X starter, NFL activist, union rep, attorney and businessman; Sandy Rosenberg ’72, current 40-year Democratic member of the Maryland House of Delegates and adjunct law professor; and Rick Swartz ’72, P’11, human rights litigator, architect of strange-bedfellow reform alliances on complex domestic and global challenges, and activist entrepreneur. Presented by the Classes of 1971 and 1972.
Johnson Chapel
1:45 PM to 2:45 PM
The U.S. Government's Efforts to Degrade Russia’s Ability to Wage War in Ukraine
This presentation features an armchair conversation with Matt Axelrod ’92, the Assistant Secretary for Export Enforcement at the U.S. Department of Commerce, and Toby Wolf ’92, a career foreign service officer at the U.S. Department of State with previous diplomatic assignments to Russia. The conversation will focus on the U.S. government's response to Russia's unprovoked war against Ukraine. Presented by the Class of 1992.
Stirn Auditorium
1:45 PM to 3:45 PM
Amherst Asian Alumni Reception
Join the Amherst Asian Alumni Network (AAAN) to celebrate Asian alumni across all years and the advancement of Asian / Pacific / American Studies at the College. Food and drinks will be provided. All are welcome. To RSVP, please register by emailing amherst.asian.alumni@gmail.com.
Tent behind Alumni Gymnasium
2:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Amherst Reunion Crew Row
If you peered between the trees along the riverbank and were startled to see a rowing shell gliding across the face of the water, the urge to jump into the boat would be difficult to extinguish. How satisfying would it be to lean on the rudder again and holler at individuals who are not your children, or press your weight against the foot-stretcher to leverage the shell forward? The experience would fill the hollowness that has ensued since the last time you sat in a boat. Please join us for an afternoon on the river at our annual Reunion gathering at the boathouse. Coach Bill Stekl will also give an update on the progress and success of the students on the Amherst College rowing team, who move boats faster than any of us.
Amherst College Boathouse (Sportsman’s Marina, Route 9 at Coolidge Bridge)
3:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Science Behind Superheroes
In this show, discover the real science behind some of the most popular superhero powers! Children will explore the science of flight, how science can make things invisible and how Spiderman might walk up walls using fun, high-energy experiments. Presented by Mad Science of Western New England.
Main Quadrangle
3:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Outliving Ambition
David Black ’67, P’99, and Ed Tivnan ’67 will discuss how age has affected our goals and ambitions—and what replaces them. Presented by the Class of 1967.
Stirn Auditorium
3:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Navigating the Impact of COVID and State Violence in the Workplace
Join the Class of 2012 for a discussion on the ongoing impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, uprisings in defense of Black life and the increase of anti-Asian violence on different industries. Owanate Briggs ’12, Ph.D. student in the Health Outcomes division at the University of Texas at Austin; Mwanzaa Brown ’12, Architectural Designer at Perkins Eastman; and Elaine Teng ’12, Editor and Writer at ESPN, will shed light on how navigating the workplace, and how our work is perceived and received in the world, has changed dramatically since 2020. Presented by the Class of 2012.
Kirby Memorial Theater
3:00 PM to 4:00 PM
The Gender Revolution: A Facilitated Discussion
Join Sam Guzzardi ’07, published author and licensed psychoanalyst working in New York City, for a group discussion of the incredible transformation of gender—including norms, roles, concepts and societal significance—over the last 15 years since the Class of 2007 graduated. No special expertise or experience with the topic is required. Sam has designed the session to ensure that everyone can participate safely and effectively as we discuss this timely and exciting topic. Presented by the Class of 2007.
Friedmann Room, Keefe Campus Center
3:00 PM to 4:00 PM
The Current State of Content Production
Several members of the Class of 1992 who have crafted careers in creative content production discuss their past and current projects and where the industry may be headed in the very near future. Panelists include Gregg Greenberg ’92, Writer/Producer, Friends and Romans, and Jeanne Herring ’92, Clearance Producer, The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills. Moderated by Josh Mora ’92, Executive Director, Strategic Partnerships at Full Sail University and Founder of Do Easy Productions. Presented by the Class of 1992.
Lipton Lecture Hall (E110), Science Center
3:15 PM to 5:00 PM
Physics and Astronomy Alumni Reception
All are welcome. Reception ends at 5 p.m.
Eighmy Powerhouse Patio
4:15 PM to 5:15 PM
Open Source and the Commons
Why do tech companies large and small give away their most important software for free? Turns out they’ve been doing this for decades, and you’re reaping the benefits without even knowing it. Come learn from Loren Crary ’07, Director of Resource Development at the Python Software Foundation, and Adam Kaplan ’07, Principal Software Engineer at Red Hat, as they discuss the triumphs and tragedies of collaborating “the open-source way” and how their roles in software foundations support the communities that drive modern innovation. Presented by the Class of 2007.
Lipton Lecture Hall (E110), Science Center
4:15 PM to 5:15 PM
45+ Years of Women’s Sports at Amherst: A Conversation with Coach Michelle Morgan
Michelle Morgan is retiring this month after 44 years coaching women at Amherst. Hear stories from the earliest days of coeducation to the present day from this remarkable educator. Coach Morgan will be in conversation with media executive Kathleen Murphy ’82. Presented by the Class of 1982.
Johnson Chapel
5:15 PM to 6:15 PM
LGBTQ+ Alumni Reception
Come and join us for an LGBTQ+ alumni reception outside the Science Center. Hosted by the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, this informal gathering will be a chance for LGBTQ+ alumni and their families to come together in community and celebration during Reunion weekend. Join us to share, celebrate and uplift the experiences of Amherst's queer and trans alumni. All are welcome! 
Schupf Terrace, Science Center
5:15 PM to 6:15 PM
Alumni in the Arts Reception
All alumni working in or passionate about the arts are invited to connect with each other and Amherst College faculty and staff in the arts. This reception is supported by the Arts at Amherst Initiative; the Amherst College Departments of Art & the History of Art, English and Music; the Amherst Center for Russian Culture; the Mead Art Museum; the Loeb Center for Career Exploration and Planning; and The Common.
Tent behind Alumni Gymnasium
9:00 PM to 10:00 PM
The Zumbyes’ Reunion Show
The Zumbyes welcome all Zum-alums, Amherst alums, friends, fans and anyone else to Buckley Recital Hall to celebrate the 72nd year of the group with a free concert of new songs, classic songs and, of course, our beloved College songs.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
Sunday, June 5, 2022
8:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Smith House Reception Center Open
We'll be open for you to drop off your keys or ask last-minute questions before you head home. 
Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Reception Center will close at noon.
Smith House, 22 Hitchcock Road (across from Orr Rink)
9:00 AM to 10:00 AM
Service of Remembrance and Community
Please join us for an ecumenical service to remember the lives of those alumni we have lost this year.
War Memorial, Memorial Hill (Rain location: Johnson Chapel)